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Home > Australian Cats > Australian Mist

Australian Mist

The Australian Mist, initially known as the Spotted Mist is an attractive short-haired feline breed developed by crossing the Abyssinian, Burmese, Moggy and other unknown domestic cats with short hairs. These moderate-sized cats have a round head, large, expressive green-colored eyes, big ears, short coat and plumpy-furred tail.

Quick Information

Other Names Initially called the Spotted Mist
Coat Very short without an undercoat
Color Warm Brown, Lilac, Peach, Blue, Gold, Chocolate, Caramel
Group Domestic
Life Expectancy 10 to 16 years
Weight 3kg to 7kg
Personality Traits Lively, Fun-loving, Relaxed, Tolerant, Affectionate
Shedding Average
Good with Children Yes
Vocalization Moderate
Hypoallergenic Yes
Country of Origination Australia

History

This rare breed began to be developed in 1976 by Dr. Truda Straede of the Nintu Cattery with the intention of creating a short-haired breed having a spotted coat. Initially called the Spotted Mist, it underwent a name change and was christened to the Australian Mist in the year 1998. The reason for their name change was that the marbled-coated cats rather than the spotted ones were accepted as a part of this breed.

In March, 2007, two Australian Mists were brought to the United Kingdom from Australia. They further gained recognition from the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy. At present, there are about 100 Australian Mists in the United Kingdom. It has been recognized for championships by the World Cat Federation, completing 27 years in 2013 as a breed for championships.

At present, they are recognized by the Australian National Cats, Catz New Zealand, New Zealand Cat Fancy, World Cat Federation, United Feline Organization (USA), American Cat Fanciers Association, Governing Council of the Cat Fancy of UK and the Australian Cat Federation.

Temperament and Personality

These easy-to-handle cats have an affectionate, docile, companionable nature. They love to be surrounded by people, spending most of their time with their owners and getting involved in family activities. Being clingy, they enjoy crawling into the nearest available lap even if uninvited. This trait of theirs makes them a good choice for people staying at home or affected by some kind of physical deformity.

This inquisitive breed enjoys hanging around, observing what people are doing. Their flexibility in staying indoors makes them widely suited for people desiring to keep pets within the premises of their homes. Not having any inclination towards scratching, they are aptly suited for children of all age. The Australian Mist kittens are very playful, going on to transform into sober and mature cats as they grow up. Their amicable behavior helps them adjust well in houses having multiple pets. In fact, the neutered or sprayed cats get along conveniently with the other pets including dogs that are cat-friendly.

Care

Exercise

An adult Australian Mist is less active in comparison to the kittens, thus needing a moderate amount of exercise to keep them playful, also lessening the chance of getting obese. As they love remaining indoors, engage them with certain attractive toys to help them play about as well as have a good time.

Grooming

They need minimal grooming. Their short coats can be hand brushed at least twice a week. They have a risk of suffering from gingivitis, thus proper dental hygiene should be given to them. Put them on a dental diet and brush their teeth on a regular basis.

Health Problem

This hardy breed live up to their teens and do not suffer any specific health concerns. However, they are prone to certain common ailments suffered by most feline breeds like eye problem, urinary tract disease, tapeworms, diabetes, renal failure and hyperthyroidism. Their light-colored coats increase their risk of developing skin allergies or even cancer. Do not forget to check with your vet for the necessary vaccinations to be given to your pet.

Training

Their pleasant, intelligent nature makes them be trained in a convenient way. You can train this faithful breed to go for a walk using a leash and collar or perform certain amusing tricks.

Feeding

The Australian Mists can be given meat, tinned fish, minced beef as well as dry biscuits. You may also occasionally add grated cheese, yogurt, and egg yolk in its raw form. The food chunks are to be big enough to provide the kittens and cats sufficient chewing exercise. Mixing Canola oil (one teaspoon) to lean meat or fish helps in supplying the required fat.

Kittens may be provided with two or three meals a day initially, which should be reduced to two after they attain six months of age. There are certain biscuits that are used for cleaning the teeth and can be given when they are nine months of age. Rather than giving the milk you drink, supply them with milk specially made for cats as it has lesser content of lactose. While choosing dry food makes sure that it meets the requirements set by the AAFCO (American Association of Feed Control Officials.

Interesting facts

  • It is one such breed for which accurate records about its breeding history and other details have been kept.
  • This breed often goes on to win the cat shows and has many Diamond Double Grand Champions awards to its credit.
  • It has derived its color and laid-back nature from the Burmese, whereas its intelligence has been inherited from its Abyssinian parentage.
  • A striking difference between the Australian Mist and the Bengal is that the former is an excellent lap cat, whereas the latter hardly prefers to sit on anyone’s lap.

Who is the Australian Mist good for

  • Elderly people, mainly those confined to their homes with certain disabilities.
  • People desiring for a cat to thrive indoors.
  • Those who want their cats to sweep away awards at the cat show.
  • People looking for a playmate for their children.
  • Those who want a hassle free cat with less maintenance.

Australian Mist video:

Published on April 26th 2015 by under Australian Cats. Article was last reviewed on 22nd April 2017.

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